Photo 22 Jul 4 notes carflopa:

Sarah Louise Davey ceramic.

carflopa:

Sarah Louise Davey ceramic.

via Modarte.
Video 22 Jul 47 notes
Photo 22 Jul 11 notes tigrismedve:

Wind sculpture (ANTHONY HOWE http://www.howeart.net/ Greenville, South Carolina)

tigrismedve:

Wind sculpture (ANTHONY HOWE http://www.howeart.net/ Greenville, South Carolina)

via Gömböc.
Video 22 Jul 7 notes

ddesignimator:

Kate MacDowell. Not just pretty. 

via .
Photo 22 Jul 3 notes artistic-licenses:

Vase. About 1900. Modeled by Lajos Mack (Hungarian, 1876-1963). At the  Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

artistic-licenses:

Vase. About 1900. Modeled by Lajos Mack (Hungarian, 1876-1963). At the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Video 22 Jul 25 notes

sdlstudios:

Sagger Firing Method

From Wikipedia:

From the 20th century studio potters have used saggars to create decorative ceramic pieces. In this use saggars are used to create a localised reducing atmosphere, or concentrate the effects of salts, metal oxides and other materials on the surface of their ware.

Some pots may be carefully prepared for saggar firing. One method creates a smooth surface covered with clay slip, terra sigillata, which responds particularly well to the saggar technique. This slip covering may be burnished to achieve a gloss. Prepared pots are nestled into saggars filled with beds of combustible materials, such as sawdust, less combustible organic materials, salts and metals. These materials ignite or fume during firing, leaving the pot buried in layers of fine ash. Ware produced in filled saggars may display dramatic markings, with colours ranging from distinctive black and white markings to flashes of golds, greens and red tones. Porcelain and stoneware are ideal for displaying the surface patterns obtained through saggar firing. In addition to the use of saggars, some studio potters bundle pots and burnable materials within a heavy wrapping of metal foil.”

No pottery pieces in this post belong to me. They are the creations and property of other potters.

Video 22 Jul 186 notes

mayahan:

Striking Ceramic Sculptures of Human-Animal Hybrids
by Crystal Morey

via Pixel Loft.
Video 22 Jul 31 notes

ineedaguide:

"china, china" series of porcelain portrait busts by ah xian

Video 22 Jul 235 notes

therhumboogie:

By Jolan Van der Weil, by combining a liquid clay slip with a metallic powder the artist is able to set magnets around each sculpture as he pipes the mixture it is pulled into these curious shapes. See a film of the process here.  

via Rhumboogie.
Video 22 Jul 774 notes

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